Actor Ed Westwick has been accused of holding a woman hostage as a sex slave for two days in a new lawsuit.

Haley Camille Freedman claims she visited Westwick's home with a group of friends in 2014, and after everyone had left she and the former Gossip Girl star had consensual sex, but then things turned dark when the intercourse became violent.

The stylist then claims Westwick forced himself upon her as she showered the following morning, and refused to drive her to her car, so she could go home.

As a result, Freedman claims she spent 48 hours holed up with Westwick in his Los Angeles home, having unwanted sex.

She alleges she suffered bruising, bleeding, and internal tears as a result of the time she spent with the actor, according to legal papers obtained by TMZ.

But the alleged victim isn't suing Westwick - she has named her former business partners, who she claims cut her off when she first wanted to go public with the allegations, as plaintiffs.

Freedman also claims she went to a media outlet with her story, but Westwick's lawyers killed the story, telling editors she was "unstable, disturbed, and promiscuous".

Last year (17), Ed denied claims of rape brought against him by actresses Kristina Cohen, Aurelie Wynn and Rachel Eck.

"I have never forced myself in any manner, on any woman," he said in a statement. "I certainly have never committed rape," adding, "I am co-operating with the authorities so that they can clear my name as soon as possible."

The drama cost Westwick his role in three-part BBC series Ordeal By Innocence.

The mini-series was yanked from the Christmas schedule in November (17), as the former Gossip Girl star fought claims he sexually assaulted the three women at his home in California - and now his scenes have been reshot with Christian Cooke in his role.

Westwick's ex-girlfriend Jessica Szohr has come to his defence, accusing the three women of "stretching the truth".

"I have known Ed for years and know how lovely he is, and don't think he would ever put someone in a position like that," Szohr told Cosmopolitan. "It's difficult, because you don't want someone you know to go through that or do that to someone."