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Interviews review

Jay Rincon interview

added: 22 Feb 2013 // release date: 10 Feb 2013
certificate: // director:
studio: Gatehouse // film length
reviewer: Claudia A

Jay-Rincon-interview Printable version
Film-News readers may recall my recent review of the Gershwin musical Crazy For You, featuring up- and coming Jay Rincon in the male lead role as ‘Bobby Child’. Jay, a native of Michigan, USA, took time out from exploring the UK to chat with Film-News pixie Claudia A.

Film-News: Jay, you are from Michigan originally. What made you decide to cross the pond and pursue a career in London, instead of much nearer New York say?

Jay Rincon:
It was more of a result then a decision. I graduated from college some time ago. My first destination was Los Angeles. Most if not all of the graduates from my university ventured off to New York. The program was designed for it. I went against the grain and headed to Los Angeles. After many years of trial and error I found myself on a cruise ship singing and dancing. I met some very important people in my life there. Some were from London. It got my attention and I came here to check the place out.

Film-News:
Previous credits include parts in ‘Arsenic And Old Lace’ and ‘Love’s Labour’s Lost’. But you also played Freddy in ‘My Fair Lady’, and recently you played the lead in ‘Crazy For You’. Where do you feel more at home? In theatre, or in musical land?

JR:
Theatre. All the singing and dancing I do is supported if not created by the acting aspect. You would be surprised how often people think you are a good dancer or singer if you act like one. Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if they didn't. Ha!

Film-News:
How familiar, if at all, were you with ‘Crazy For You’ before you landed the role, and what prompted you to audition for the part in the first place?

JR:
It has always been a role I dreamed of playing. I was in the ensemble years ago. I remember watching our ‘Bobby Child’ in that production and saying "I will do that someday." It looked like he was working very hard. I understand what he was going through now.

Film-News:
With two-and-a-half hours running time, it was a relatively long show… and as the lead, you got to sing and to dance a lot in it. It must have been be physically challenging to perform that routine every night?

JR:
Keeping fit is exactly just that, I exercise. As for the show, it was a beast. And to be honest, I worked awfully hard at pacing myself. As a performer you want to give give give, but you do have to be aware of your own physical limitations. Focusing on giving a healthy performance is the most important thing.

Film-News:
What’s it like to perform with your co-stars, in particular with your female lead, Ceili O’Connor?

JR:
It was an absolute pleasure. They were all professionals, and loads of fun to work with. And Ms. O'Connor, well she was ‘Polly’, and a darn good one. It was easy for us to create the world every night.

Film-News:
How was working with John Plews as a director – did he give you guys some creative freedom, or was it more an “Ok, we gonna do it like that” scenario?

JR:
John was great. And I would say he is an entertainer at heart. From the beginning it was all about entertaining. Whatever it took. And with that, you have the freedom to create. But he was never shy about giving a note and keeping things in order.

Film-News:
Going by your physical appearance, but also by the way you move and dance, I can see you as Bernardo Nuñez, leader of The Sharks, in ‘West Side Story’… If an opportunity to play him came along, would you grab the bull by its horns?

JR:
Well that ‘rodeo’ has always been a fancy of mine, just not that bull’. I could never and will never play Tony. But it doesn't keep me from dreaming. It’s always been one of my favorites. It would be fun to be on stage battling against him though. And hey, it’s West Side Story.

Film-News:
What are your favourite musicals, and which roles (both theatre and musical) would you love to play one day?

JR:
I suppose I'm not too original here. Once again ‘Tony’ in West Side Story. Hamlet. Curly. Don Lockwood. Off the top of my head.

Film-News: How’s life in London treating you so far? Having a ball over here, or are you homesick for the US?

JR:
I have been in a few places around the world and I love London. Its a big place but easy to get around. The smaller size of everything was different at first. But I have gotten used to it. Next time I am back in America I'm sure people will turn to look at me when I am moaning about crossing the street and how far the walk is.

Film-News:
You take an interest in British Music Hall, particularly late 19th Century/early 20th Century Music Hall. What is it that interests you about it? Also, in your opinion, what are the most significant differences, compared to American Vaudeville?

JR:
The culture. I still can't get enough of it. And don't understand half of it. I learn something new everyday. Sitting back and watching classic American humor get blank stares and then seeing the theater light up at a joke I completely missed is great. It really is so particular. I adore it.

Film-News:
Typically British Music Hall songs/sketches, especially the ones performed in London venues, were often delivered in ‘Cockney English’. I mean the proper Cockney, not the Dick Van Dyke take on it… Do you find it hard to understand?

JR:
Yes. Very.

Film-News:
What’s next for you, once ‘Crazy For You’ is finished?

JR:
I will be back in America to see family for a stint then I am back to London. After Steel Pier at The Union and Crazy For You at the Gatehouse, I am ready for a little break. But I am also incredibly anxious to get back to work with auditions.

Film-News:
Many thanks for your time, Jay, and I do hope London holds more roles in store for you.

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